Day-Tour

Day tours or Half day tours for Cairo and Alexandria are available during 22-31 October 2017.

So before, during or after Cairo Congress, you can visit various sites in Cairo, such as the Giza Pyramid and the Sphinx, Egyptian Museum, the Citadel of  Saladin, or go shopping at Khan El Khalili Bazaars.  Coptic Churches in Cairo is another attraction. “Coptic” means “Christian”.  As Jesus grew up in Egypt as a child, Coptic churches and quarters include places where Jesus used to visit as well.

A day tour would allow you to either explore Cairo more fully, spend half of the day explore Memphis and Sakkara nearby, or venture out to Alexandria, 2.5 hours drive away.  Alexandria was the ancient capital of Egypt. Cleopatra once rule Egypt from this city. 

CAIRO : Half Day Tour

Tour 1: Visit the Egyptian Museum:

US$ 40  per person

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo contains the world's most extensive collection of pharaonic Antiquities. The original collection was established in the late 19th century under Auguste Mariette and housed in Boulaq. The objects were moved in 1891 to the palace of Ismail Pasha in Giza before being transferred in 1902 to the current building at Tahrir Square, which is the first purpose-built museum edifice in the world. Egyptian Museum boasts 107 halls filled with artifacts dating from the prehistoric through the Roman periods, with the majority of the collection focused on the pharaonic era. The museum houses approximately 160,000 objects covering 5,000 years of Egypt's past.

Tour 2: Visit the Pyramids & the Sphinx

US$ 40 per person

Constructed between 2589 and 2504 B.C., the Egyptian pyramids of Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure, built in that order, are a testament to ancient planning and engineering. Howe it was built is a source of speculation and debate. When the pyramids were completed they were encased in white limestone, most of which is lost today.

Additionally, archaeologists have found new evidence that Giza had a bustling port, allowing goods to be shipped to the site from across Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean. Despite the differences among the three pyramids (Khufu’s pyramid, the "Great Pyramid," is several times the mass of Menkaure’s) the southeast tips of each pyramid align together almost precisely.

The Sphinx, an enigmatic monument usually associated with king Khafre, stands watch near his valley temple. In addition, tombs sprawling to the east and west of Khufu’s pyramid contain the remains of officials, royal relatives and others who had the privilege to be buried there.

Tour 3: Visit Citadel of Saladin &  Khan El Khalili Bazaars

US$38 per person

The Citadel of Saladin, built by Salah El Din Al Ayoubi, the famous king and army leader and the founder of the Ayyubid Dynasty. It was built during the 12th century. The citadel was used as the seat of the king and his government for many centuries. The citadel has always played a significant role in the political life of Egypt and  it defended Egypt against many attacks in different period of time.

The Khan El Khalili Bazaars, was named after Prince Jaharkas Al Khalili, who was one of the most powerful  Mamluk Princes in the 14th century. It is famous for its unusual, typically oriental souvenirs and handmade crafts. The Medieval atmosphere of this traditional market, together with the labyrinth layout of the streets, gives visitors a lot of pleasure and a glimpse into what the medieval markets once were like.

Tour 4: Visit Coptic Cairo churches and quartersEl Khalili Bazaars

US$38 per person

Coptic Cairo is a part of Old Cairo which encompasses the Babylon Fortress, the Coptic Museum, the Hanging Church, the Greek Church of St. George and many other Coptic churches and historical sites. It is believed in Christian tradition that the Holy Family visited this area and stayed at the site of Saints Sergius and Bacchus Church (Abu Serga). Coptic Cairo was a stronghold for Christianity in Egypt until the Islamic era, though most of the current buildings of the churches in Coptic Cairo were built after the Muslim conquest of Egypt in the 7th century.

MEMPHIS : Half Day Tour

Tour 5: Memphis and Sakkara

US$40 per person

Memphis was the ancient capital of Aneb-Hetch, the first leader of Lower Egypt. Its ruins are located near the town of Mit Rahina, 20 km south of Giza. According to legend related by Manetho, the city was founded by the pharaoh Menes.  Capital of Egypt during the Old Kingdom, it remained an important city throughout ancient Mediterranean history.

Sakkara, is an ancient burial ground in Egypt, serving as the necropolis for the Ancient Egyptian capital, Memphis. Saqqara features numerous pyramids, including the world-famous Step pyramid of Djoser, sometimes referred to as the Step Tomb due to its rectangular base, as well as a number of mastabas. Located some 30 km (19 mi) south of modern-day Cairo, Saqqara covers an area of around 7 by 1.5 km (4.35 by 0.93 mi).

 

CAIRO : Full Day Tour

Tour 6: Visit the Egyptian Museum, the Citadel of Saladin & the Khan El Khalili Bazaars


US$ 58 per person

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo contains the world's most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities; no visit to Egypt is complete without a trip through its galleries. The original collection was established in the late 19th century under Auguste Mariette and housed in Boulaq. The objects were moved in 1891 to the palace of Ismail Pasha in Giza before being transferred in 1902 to the current building at Tahrir Square, which is the first purpose-built museum edifice in the world.


The Citadel of Saladin
, built by Salah El Din Al Ayoubi, the famous king and army leader and the founder of the Ayyubid Dynasty. It was built during the 12th century. The citadel was used as the seat of the king and his government for many centuries. The citadel has always palyed a significant role in the political life of Egypt and  it defended Egypt against many attacks in different period of time.

The Khan El Khalili Bazaars, was named after Prince Jaharkas Al Khalili, who was one of the most powerful  Mamluk Princes in the 14th century. It is famous for its unusual, typically oriental souvenirs and handmade crafts. The Medieval atmosphere of this traditional market, together with the labyrinth layout of the streets, gives visitors a lot of pleasure and a glimpse into what the medieval markets once were like.

Tour 7: Visit the Pyramids, the Sphinx, Memphis & Sakkara


US$ 58 per person

The Sphinx, an enigmatic monument usually associated with king Khafre, stands watch near his valley temple. In addition, tombs sprawling to the east and west of Khufu’s pyramid contain the remains of officials, royal relatives and others who had the privilege to be buried there.

The Pyramids, constructed between 2589 and 2504 B.C., the Egyptian pyramids of Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure, built in that order, are a testament to ancient planning and engineering. Archaeologists have found new evidence that Giza had a bustling port, allowing goods to be shipped to the site from across Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean.

Memphis was the ancient capital of Aneb-Hetch, the first leader of Lower Egypt. Its ruins are located near the town of Mit Rahina, 20 km south of Giza. According to legend related by Manetho, the city was founded by the pharaoh Menes.  Capital of Egypt during the Old Kingdom, it remained an important city throughout ancient Mediterranean history.

Sakkara, is an ancient burial ground in Egypt, serving as the necropolis for the Ancient Egyptian capital, Memphis. Saqqara features numerous pyramids, including the world-famous Step pyramid of Djoser, sometimes referred to as the Step Tomb due to its rectangular base, as well as a number of mastabas. Located some 30 km (19 mi) south of modern-day Cairo, Saqqara covers an area of around 7 by 1.5 km (4.35 by 0.93 mi).

Tour 8: Visit the Pyramids, the Sphinx, the Egyptian Museum & the Khan El Khalili Bazaars                 


US$ 67 per person

The Sphinx, an enigmatic monument usually associated with king Khafre, stands watch near his valley temple. In addition, tombs sprawling to the east and west of Khufu’s pyramid contain the remains of officials, royal relatives and others who had the privilege to be buried there.

The Pyramids, constructed between 2589 and 2504 B.C., the Egyptian pyramids of Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure, built in that order, are a testament to ancient planning and engineering. Archaeologists have found new evidence that Giza had a bustling port, allowing goods to be shipped to the site from across Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean. 

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo contains the world's most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities; no visit to Egypt is complete without a trip through its galleries. The original collection was established in the late 19th century under Auguste Mariette and housed in Boulaq. The objects were moved in 1891 to the palace of Ismail Pasha in Giza before being transferred in 1902 to the current building at Tahrir Square, which is the first purpose-built museum edifice in the world.

The Khan El Khalili Bazaars, was named after Prince Jaharkas Al Khalili, who was one of the most powerful  Mamluk Princes in the 14th century. It is famous for its unusual, typically oriental souvenirs and handmade crafts. The Medieval atmosphere of this traditional market, together with the labyrinth layout of the streets, gives visitors a lot of pleasure and a glimpse into what the medieval markets once were like.

ALEXANDRIA

Tour 9: Visit Alexandria National Museum, the Catacombs, the Pompeus Pillar & Alexandria Library


US$ 120.00 per person (including Lunch)

One of the most well known figure in Egypt history is Cleopatra. When she ruled Egypt, Alexandria was its capital.

Alexandria is a Mediterranean port city in Egypt, founded by Alexander the Great in 333BC. During the Hellenistic period, it was home to a lighthouse ranking among the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World as well as a storied library. Today the library is reincarnated in the disc-shaped, ultramodern Bibliotheca Alexandrina. The city also has Greco-Roman landmarks, old-world cafes and sandy beaches.

Alexandria’s ancient library was one of the greatest of all classical institutions, and while replacing it might seem a Herculean task, the new Bibliotheca Alexandrina manages it with aplomb. Opened in 2002, this impressive piece of modern architecture is a deliberate attempt to rekindle the brilliance of the original center of learning and culture. The complex has become one of Egypt’s major cultural venues and a stage for numerous international performers, and is home to a collection of brilliant museums.

The National Museum, this excellent museum sets a high benchmark for summing up Alexandria’s past. Housed in a beautifully restored Italianate villa, the small but thoughtfully selected and well-labelled collection does a sterling job of relating the city’s history from antiquity until the modern period.

The Catacombs, discovered accidentally in 1900 when a donkey disappeared through the ground, these catacombs are the largest known Roman burial site in Egypt and one of the last major works of construction dedicated to the religion of ancient Egypt.

The Pompeus Pillar, This massive 30m column looms over the debris of the glorious ancient settlement of Rhakotis, the original township from which Alexandria grew. Known as Pompey’s Pillar, for centuries the column, hewn from red Aswan granite, has been one of the city’s prime sights: a single, tapered shaft, 2.7m at its base and capped by a fine Corinthian capital. The column rises out of the sparse ruins of the Temple of Serapeum, a magnificent structure that stood here in ancient times.

Note:  All Day Tour requires the minimum 3 paying guests.